Secure Shopping





Bluebird Houses
Eastern Bluebird House
Mountain Bluebird House
Western Bluebird House
Sparrow-resistant Bluebird House
Observation Bluebird House
Peterson Bluebird House
Backyard Bird House

Purple Martin Houses
Purple Martin House

Wood Duck Houses
Wood Duck House
Small Wood Duck House

Chickadee Houses
Chickadee House
Backyard Bird House

Swallow Houses
Barn Swallow House
Tree Swallow House
Violet-green Swallow House
Backyard Bird House

Wren Houses
House Wren House
Hanging Wren House
Hanging Carolina Wren House
Backyard Bird House

Woodpecker Houses
Northern Flicker House
Red-headed Woodpecker House
Hairy Woodpecker House
Downy Woodpecker House

Nuthatch Houses
White-breasted Nuthatch House
Red-breasted Nuthatch House
Backyard Bird House

Owl Houses
Screech Owl House
Barn Owl House
Barred Owl House
Northern Saw-whet Owl House

Flycatcher Houses
Great Crested Flycatcher House
Ash-throated Flycatcher House

Duck Houses
Hooded Merganser House
Bufflehead House
Common Merganser House
Goldeneye House

Titmouse Houses
Titmouse House
Backyard Bird House

Finch Houses
Finch House
Backyard Bird House

Kestrel Houses
Kestrel House

Robin Houses
Robin House

Winter Bird Houses
Small Winter Bird House
Large Winter Bird House










Tips on Birdhouse Placement

When to place birdhouses
Make sure your birdhouses are in place well before the breeding season begins. Don’t be discouraged if the birds do not begin nesting in your box immediately; sometimes it takes time for the birds to find it.
* In the south, place your birdhouses by February.
* In northern regions, place your birdhouses by mid to late March.

If you are looking to attract a variety of species to your nest boxes and have ample room, you might consider pairing your boxes. This involves placing boxes in pairs on poles 15 to 25 feet apart; or you can put two boxes, back to back, on a single pole. Birds such as Tree Swallows and bluebirds will nest closely to one another, although conspecifics will be driven away. Pairing boxes has the advantage of allowing more birds of both species to coexist peacefully within the same habitat.

Golf courses, cultivated fields, gardens, and yards are great habitats for nest boxes, but avoid areas where pesticides and herbicides are used. These agents are not only harmful to birds, they decrease and sometimes eliminate insect populations—the primary food source for many cavity-nesting species.

How to place your birdhouse
Whichever method you choose to erect your boxes, be sure your box is secure enough to withstand high winds and severe weather.

The best way to erect small nest boxes is on free-standing metal poles or PVC pipes. These pipes or poles offer several advantages:

* Nest boxes can be mounted higher than when mounted on a fence post.
* Many predators find poles difficult to climb.
* Poles can also be easily equipped with a predator guard.

Where to place nest boxes

Bluebird
open field or lawn; orchards; open, rural country with scattered trees and low or sparse ground cover; Mountain and Western bluebirds will also use deciduous and coniferous forest edges; entrance hole should face open field, preferring east, north, south, and then west facing directions.
box height: 3-6 feet

Purple Martin
broad open areas (meadows, fields, farmland, swamps, ponds, lakes, rivers) with unobstructed space for foraging on flying insects; there should be no trees or buildings within 40 feet of the martin pole in any direction
box height: 10-15 feet

Wood Duck
forested wetlands or near marshes, swamps, and beaver ponds; place boxes in deciduous trees, 30-100 feet from the nearest water, spaced 600 feet apart. add 3" of wood shavings
box height: 6-30 feet

American Kestrel
pastures, fields, meadows, or orchards with mowed or grazed vegetation; place boxes on lone trees in fields, on trees along edges of woodlots, and on farm buildings
box height: 10-30 feet

Eastern Screech Owl
forests, parks, woodland clearings, forest edges, wooded stream edges, under a tree limb. entrance hole should face north. Add 2"-3" of wood shavings
box height: 10-30 feet

Western Screech Owl
lower elevations, forests, parks, woodland clearings, forest edges, deserts, wooded stream edges, under a tree limb. entrance hole should face north. Add 2"-3" of wood shavings
box height: 10-30 feet

Great Crested Flycatcher
deciduous or mixed deciduous-coniferous forests, forest edges, woodlots, orchards, parks, on post or tree at forest edge
box height: 3-20 feet

Ash-throated Flycatcher
chaparral, mesquite thickets, oak scrub, dry plains spotted with trees or cacti, deserts, and open deciduous and riparian woodlands
box height: 3-20 feet

Northern Flicker
pastures, groves, woodlots, orchards, fields, meadows, woodland clearings, forest edges, urban parks, on pole or tree at forest edge or along fence rows bordering crop fields; box should be completely filled with wood chips or shavings. entrance hole should face southeast
box height: 6-30 feet

Tree Swallow
open fields near water, expansive open areas, marshes, meadows, wooded swamps; on a post in open areas near tree or fence, 30-100 feet apart. entrance hole should face east
box height: 5-15 feet

Violet-green Swallow
open or broken deciduous or mixed deciduous-coniferous forests, wooded canyons, edges of dense forest
box height: 9-15 feet

Tufted Titmouse
deciduous forest, thick timber stands, woodland clearings, forest edges, woodlots, riparian and mesquite habitats; spaced one box per 8 acres, hole should face away from prevailing wind
box height: 5-15 feet

Black-capped Chickadee
forests, woodlots, and yards with mature hardwood trees, forest edges, meadows, area should receive 40-60% sunlight, spaced one box per 10 acres, hole should face away from prevailing wind; 1" shaving can be placed in box
box height: 5-15 feet

Carolina Chickadee
forests, woodlots, and yards with mature hardwood trees, forest edges, meadows, area should receive 40-60% sunlight, hole should face away from prevailing wind; 1" shaving can be placed in box
box height: 5-15 feet

Mountain Chickadee
coniferous forests, forest edges, woodland clearings; hole should face away from prevailing wind; 1" shaving can be placed in box
box height: 5-15 feet

Chestnut-backed Chickadee
coniferous forests, mixed deciduous-coniferous forests, forest edges, woodlands, thickets, burned areas, often near streams; hole should face away from prevailing wind; 1" shaving can be placed in box
box height: 5-15 feet

White-breasted Nuthatch
deciduous woodlands, mature forests, woodlots, near open areas, forest edges, orchards, often near water; hole should face away from prevailing wind; 1" shaving can be placed in box
box height: 5-20 feet

Red-breasted Nuthatch
mixed coniferous-deciduous forests, shrub lands, swamps, farmlands, suburban parks; hole should face away from prevailing wind; 1" shaving can be placed in box
box height: 5-15 feet

Brown-headed Nuthatch
open stands of pine-hardwood forests, clearings scattered with dead trees, forest edges, burned areas, cypress swamps
box height: 5-20 feet

House Wren
variety of habitats, farmland, openings, open forests, forest edges, shrub lands, suburban gardens, parks, backyards; near trees or tall shrubs
box height: 5-10 feet

Carolina Wren
forests with thick underbrush, forest edges, woodland clearings, open forests, shrub lands, suburban gardens, parks, backyards; near trees or tall shrubs
box height: 5-10 feet

Prothonotary Warbler
lowland hardwood forests subject to flooding, stagnant water, swamps, ponds, marshes, streams, flooded river valleys, wet bottomlands; box should be over or near water
box height: 2-12 feet

Hooded Merganser
quiet, shallow, clear water pools surrounded by or near the edge of deciduous woods: small forest pools, ponds, swamps; add 3" of wood shavings
box height: 6-25 feet



Coveside Bird House Features




Copyright 2004
Coveside Bird Houses