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How to put up a Bat House

Northeastern United States
Where you mount your bat house plays a major role in the internal temperature. Houses can be mounted on such structures as poles, sides of buildings and tall trees without obstructions. Houses placed on poles and structures tend to become occupied quicker than houses placed on trees. Bat houses should face south to southeast to take advantage of the morning sun. In northern states and Canada, bat houses need to receive at least 6 to 8 hours of direct sunlight. It is also advantageous to paint the house black to absorb plenty of heat (when baby bats are born, they need it very warm). Use non-toxic, latex paint to paint your bat house and only paint the outside. Your bat house should be mounted at least 15 feet above the ground, the higher the house the greater the chance of attracting bats. Bats return from migration and awaken from hibernation as early as March in most of the U.S., but stay active year-round in the extreme southern U.S. They will be abundant through out the summer and into late fall. Most houses used by bats are occupied in the first 1 to 6 months (during the first summer the bat house was erected). If bats do not roost in your house by the end of the second summer, move the house to another location.

Throughout the northern two-thirds of the U.S. and Canada, the
Little Brown Bat (Myotis lucifugus) and the Big Brown Bat (Eptesicus fuscus) use bat houses. They can also inhabit the Southeast, but are generally replaced by the Southeastern Bat (Myotis austropiparius). Pallid Bats (Antrozous pallidus) are found in arid areas. The Evening Bat (Nycticeius humeralis), Eastern Pipistrelle Bat (Pipistrellus subflavus), Yuma Myotis (Myotis yumanensis) and the Mexican Free-tailed Bat (Tadarida brasiliensis) will also use bat houses. Any bats that roost in crevices or under bridges and in buildings are likely tenants for bat houses.


Northwestern United States
In Northwestern states, bat houses need at least six to eight hours of direct sun daily. It is very important for nursery colonies to raise their young under warm conditions. You should even paint your bat house black to absorb more heat. Use a non-toxic, latex paint for your house and only paint the outside. Remember that where you mount your bat house plays a major role in the internal temperature. Houses can be mounted on such structures as poles, sides of buildings and tall trees without obstructions. Houses placed on poles and structures tend to become occupied quicker than houses placed on trees. Houses should face south to southeast to take advantage of the morning sun. Your bat house should be mounted at least 15 feet above the ground, the higher the house the greater the chance of attracting bats. Bats return from migration and awaken from hibernation as early as March in most of the U.S., but stay active year-round in the extreme southern U.S. They will be abundant through out the summer and into late fall. Most houses used by bats are occupied in the first 1 to 6 months (during the first summer the bat house was erected). If bats do not roost in your house by the end of the second summer, move the house to another location.

Some of the most common bat species to occupy bat houses in northwestern states are as follows:
Pallid Bat (Antrozous pallidus) a large pale colored bat with large ears, Little Brown Bat (Myotis lucifugus), Big Brown Bat (Eptesicus fuscus), Yuma Myotis (Myotis yumanensis), and Mexican Free-tailed Bat (Tadarida brasiliensis), all of which are light to dark brown in color.


Southeastern United States
In southeastern states you can attract certain bats species if the house is placed in total sun, other species prefer partial sun, and some bats use bat houses placed in total shade. You can paint your bat house white, or leave it a natural color. If you paint your bat house, use a non-toxic, latex paint and only paint the outside of the house. Remember that where you mount your bat house plays a major role in the internal temperature. Houses can be mounted on such structures as poles, sides of buildings and tall trees without obstructions. Houses placed on poles and structures tend to become occupied quicker than houses placed on trees. Houses should face south to southeast to take advantage of the morning sun. Your bat house should be mounted at least 15 feet above the ground, the higher the house the greater the chance of attracting bats. Bats return from migration and awaken from hibernation as early as March in most of the U.S., but stay active year-round in the extreme southern U.S. They will be abundant through out the summer and into late fall. Most houses used by bats are occupied in the first 1 to 6 months (during the first summer the bat house was erected). If bats do not roost in your house by the end of the second summer, move the house to another location.

Some of the most common bat species to occupy bat houses in southeastern states are as follows:
Southeastern Bat (Myotis austropiparius), Evening Bat (Nycticeius humeralis), Eastern Pipistrelle Bat (Pipistrellus subflavus), Big Brown Bat (Eptesicus fuscus), and Mexican Free-tailed Bat (Tadarida brasiliensis), all of which are light to dark brown in color.


Southwestern United States
In southwestern states you can attract certain bats species if the house is placed in total sun, other species prefer partial sun, and some bats use houses placed in total shade. You can paint your bat house white or leave it natural. If you paint it, use a non-toxic, latex paint and only paint the outside of the house. Remember that where you mount your bat house plays a major role in the internal temperature. Houses can be mounted on such structures as poles, sides of buildings and tall trees without obstructions. Houses should face south to southeast to take advantage of the morning sun. Your bat house should be mounted at least 15 feet above the ground, the higher the house the greater the chance of attracting bats. Bats return from migration and awaken from hibernation as early as March in most of the U.S., but stay active year-round in the extreme southern U.S. They will be abundant through out the summer and into late fall. Most houses used by bats are occupied in the first 1 to 6 months (during the first summer the bat house was erected). If bats do not roost in your house by the end of the second summer, move the house to another location.



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